THANKSGIVING!!!

Happy Thanksgiving in advance!

Thank-you for supporting me and my blog,……… that is what I wanna say thanks to you all for.

By the way to decorate your hose on thanksgiving or to make some amazing gifts, here I give you all some DIYs and ideas.

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THANKSGIVING PROCLAMATION!

George Washington declared November 26, 1789 as a day of public thanksgiving and prayer with his National thanksgiving Proclamation, but he was not the first to issue one. In fact, thanksgiving proclamations date all the way back to 1723! Now it is your child’s turn to write a thanksgiving Proclamation of their own. It may be the newest in a long line of proclamation —but with a little tea or coffee magic, it will look like just like one of the early originals. Not only is this project a meaningful way to embrace the spirit of the holiday, it’s also a chance to practice gratitude and thankfulness for the things we experience throughout the year.

What You Need:

• Regular white paper • Weakly brewed tea or coffee • Shallow pan for soaking the paper • Calligraphy pen or special marker • Matches or a lighter (optional) • Candle (optional)

What You Do: 

“Age” the Paper: (1 to 2 days in advance)

1. Prepare for the process by putting on some old clothes and finding a workspace that can get messy. Remember that tea and coffee stain fabric and other materials!

2. Pour your brewed tea or coffee into the shallow pan. Crumple the paper well, then carefully immerse it so that it is soaked through. Keep in mind that the longer you soak it, the darker it will be—but if you soak it too long it will fall apart!

3. Remove the paper from the liquid and lay it flat or hang it with clothespins to dry. This may take a day or two, or longer in more humid climates.

4. When the paper is dry, you can also create a “burned-edge” look by carefully singeing the edges with the tip of a flame. (Note: this should be done only by an adult in an area free from flammables.)

Write Your List:

1. Help your child make a detailed list of what they are thankful for. Encourage them to consider things big and small, such as a warm and cozy house to live in, parents, siblings, friends, books, plenty to eat, snow (or rain, or sun) to play in, toys, and so on

. 2. Review this list together.

3. Have your child write down what they are thankful for using a calligraphy pen (in keeping with the historic theme) or any marker they choose.

4. Have your child sign the proclamation to make it official, noting the location and date underneath. 5. You can also add an official seal to your child’s proclamation under the signature by melting a bit of candle wax and letting it drip onto the paper, then etching your child’s initials into it as it cools and hardens. (Note: this should only be done by an adult, away from flammable materials.)

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The Meaning of Thanksgiving: A Hat Full of Thankful

The meaning of Thanksgiving can sometimes get lost among the fun of food and family! Here’s a fun way to include thanks in your thanksgiving. Even the youngest children can participate with this easy project, which we’ve dubbed “A Hat Full of thankful!”

What You Need:

• A structured hat, one that holds its shape (or follow the steps below to make your own!) • Index cards or note paper • Pens or pencils For the hat: • Paper plate (dinner sized) • Two pieces of black felt (one that is about 8″ x 20″, and another that is at least as large as the paper plate) • 2½” x 2″ strip of yellow felt • Scissors • Glue or rubber cement

What You Do: 

1. Think of the hat as a thought-collector of sorts.

2. Place it upside-down on a table in the entryway of your home and surround it with a stack of index cards and a cluster of pens or pencils

3. Ask each guest to write down at least one thing for which they’re thankful. At some point during dinner, pass it around the table and have each person reach in for a card and read it aloud.

For the hat:

1. Set aside the 8″ x 20″ piece of felt, and ask your child to trace the paper plate onto the smaller piece of felt. Have your child cut out the circle he’s traced. 2. Have your child fold the circle in half and carefully cut out the inside of the circle by cutting a smaller circle out of the larger one, leaving a 2-inch “frame” of black felt all the way around.

3. Trace the shape of the felt “doughnut” onto the plate, and cut the traced circle out of the plate.

4. Glue the black felt piece onto the paper plate’s brim.

5. Glue the 8″ x 20″ piece of felt to the inside of the opening in the felt brim, standing vertically so it looks like a top hat.

6. Use the smaller black circle cut out of the brim to make the top of the hat. Glue the small circle on top of the hat to cover the opening. Let the glue dry.

7. Have your child apply the white strip of felt to the crown of the hat with glue.

8. Cut out a buckle from the yellow felt—a large square with a smaller square cut out of it—and ask your child to glue it securely to the front of the hat on the white strip. Now you’ve got a pilgrim hat!

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So ya guys those were some DIYs for celebrating amazing thanksgiving and also they are good crafts for children to have fun…

Now lets check some edibles and again these are for children to have fun. So lets begin!!!!

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Make An Apple Turkey

This is a great craft to keep kids engaged in the spirit of thanksgiving. All you need are a few apples, some toothpicks, marshmallows and raisins and you’re all set! When they’re done, the kids will have made a fabulous table decoration everyone can enjoy.

What You Need: 

• Large, red apple • Large and mini-sized marshmallows (one large, at least 20 small) • Toothpicks (seven per apple should be enough, but have extras on hand in case they break!) • Raisins (15–30) • Candy corn (one) • Scissors

What You Do:

1. Place the apple on a flat surface and remove the stem as close to the apple as possible.

2. Carefully poke a toothpick into the apple on the outer rim behind where the stem was.

3. Keep placing the toothpicks in this fashion until you have six of them fanning out behind the stem to represent the tail feathers (three clustered on one side and three on the other).

4. Once the toothpicks are in place, slide a raisin onto the first one, then a mini marshmallow, then another raisin, in a pattern. Repeat on all six toothpicks. Be sure the pattern ends with the mini marshmallow at the top so the tip of the toothpick is no longer exposed. This is a great opportunity to practice patterns.

5. Now, on to the face of the turkey! Place another toothpick in front of the six toothpicks on the opposite side of the stem. Gently press the large marshmallow onto the toothpick.

6. Using scissors, snip tiny slits into the spots where the eyes will go. Press a raisin into each eye hole. (Parents may want to help the kids with the scissors, since you’ll want to make a very small slit.) 7. Using the pointy end of the candy corn, poke it into where the nose goes and you’ve got your turkey! Make a whole family of turkeys, or one for each guest to take home.

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Edible, Personalized Cornucopia of Appreciation

A cornucopia is a traditional symbol of plenty, often overflowing with flowers, fruits, and husks of corn. Each of us, too, is also overflowing with our own “cornucopia” of gifts, strengths, and abilities. In this extra-special thanksgiving project, you will create personalized cornucopia place settings for your guests. these are just as delicious as they are heartwarming.

Note: these cornucopias use sugar cones, as well as fresh berries, nuts, and chocolate — but feel free to adapt them to your own preferences, or even personalize them for each guest. This project also adapts well to other holidays and celebrations.

What You Need:

Wrappers: • List of guests • DIY Sugar Cone Wrapper printable template (Check https://in.pinterest.com/pin/146718900345714309/?lp=true) • Printer and paper • Non-toxic pens • Non-toxic adhesive Ingredients: • Sugar cones (one per guest; have extra on hand in case some break during assembly) • Fruits, nuts (such as your favorite trail mix!), and other small food items for filling the cones. Note: Be sure to take into account any of your guests’ allergies or dietary restrictions. • Small plates

What You Do: 

Wrappers:

1. Working from your guest list, think of a quality that each person has in abundance. Intelligence? Humor? Kindness? Cute cats? Jot down for each.

2. Cut out the DIY Sugar Cone Wrapper template which you can get by simply googleing  for the template.(Check https://in.pinterest.com/pin/146718900345714309/?lp=true)

3. Using non-toxic pens, write the name of each guest on one of the templates, surrounded by the “cornucopia” of traits unique to each guest. Feel free to embellish with stickers, ribbons, or other non-toxic decorations.

4. Carefully glue or tape the wrapper shut. Make sure the adhesive is fully dry before undertaking the next step.

 Assembly:

1. Carefully place a sugar cone in each wrapper.

2. Position the cone on each plate. Arrange your chosen fillings (such as fruit and nuts) inside the cone, so that it looks like it is overflowing with nature’s bounty.

3. Repeat until you have created a cornucopia for each guest.

4. Place one at each table setting.

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And there we completed checking some amazing and delicious snacks for thanksgiving! Also these snacks can be easily made by children!

So guys if you liked the post please do not forget to follow and subscribe the blog to get daily updates directly in your inbox!

Until then Good Byeeeeeee!!!!!!

Take care!

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